Five Wedding Day Tips from a Wedding Photographer

Dont do this... Awkward!

Five tips for your wedding day

Here are five little tips that will help your Wedding day run smoothly. Being a wedding photographer I have been to more weddings, than most people.

  1. Ask your officiant to get out of the way during your first kiss.

    Unless they’re a seasoned pro, after the “You may now kiss the bride/groom” many of them just stand there...  Awkward!!  When you go into your meeting with them before your ceremony, just ask them, to step aside, so I can get the perfect first kiss photo. Don’t worry if this is something you don’t want to do, just let me know, I am happy to mention it to them so that I can get the perfect photograph for you. (I  have to look back to 2017 to find this photo, the Vicar said that I had to stand at the back!)

  2. Keep hydrated. 

    No matter what time of year your wedding will be, have a couple of bottles of water placed around the wedding venue inc. The church and reception venues, if you wearing a formal wedding dress, boy! these can be heavy. Tight, and hot to wear, and formal suits if you are not used to wearing a suit!

  3. Eat. 

    Breakfast is a must. It’s ok to have a little nibble during the day to keep you going, a little power bar cut into small pieces and kept near your water bottles if needed.

  4. Wet wipes.

    Cool wet wipes are amazing, a small cooler bag under the top table is a dream, cool wipes on your hands or just on your wrists will help keep you cool. I keep a small pack in my chiller bag all the time.

  5. Put someone else in charge.

    No matter how much of a control-fiend you are, now is the time you need to delegate!

    Getting a reliable Bridesmaid to round up your guests for your photographer, ask the Ushers to keep an eye on your mum & dad to see if they need any help, put someone else in control as this will help you to relax, as much as you can, on the day.

    When delegating roles try not to dump everything onto one person, instead, take into account people’s existing commitments and then split out the roles.